What is difference between timetable and schedule?

I’m building an application, that shows schedule/timetable for university students.
I’m confusing, what is the correct word for it: schedule or timetable?
How should I name it?

Here is the result of GitHub search for different queries:

  • university timetable – 359
  • university schedule – 742
  • students timetable – 329
  • students schedule – 1100

the difference between by -ing form and -ing form

This question involves the difference between -ing form and by -ing form.

The passage below is from a few steps guided on Microsoft’s website as to how to renew a one-year subscription of Microsoft Office 365.

Go to Office.com/setup and, if prompted, sign in using the Microsoft account that’s associated with your Office 365 subscription.

I am wondering whether the sentence would be still correct and mean the same thing with using changed into by using as follows.

Go to Office.com/setup and, if prompted, sign in by using the Microsoft account that’s associated with your Office 365 subscription.

Thank you very much.

What are the differences between Convex Lens and Convex Mirrors?

Sometimes I heard my teacher said convex ‘lens’ but other time I heard he said convex ‘mirror’. The main problem I am currently facing right now is using the right terminology. In other words, what is the differences of similarities between a convex ‘lens’ and ‘mirrors’? With that said, do they still behave the same like one another, if they are different? Thank you.

Is there a correlation between unknown name in Revelation 19:12 and elsewhere in scripture?

I’ve always been curious to know if there was a relation between the rider on the white horse whose name was known to no one but himself, and the other places in scripture where names have been veiled. These occurred when the angel of the Lord wrestled with Jacob, as well as his visitation of Samson’s parents.

Revelation 19:12 (KJV)
His eyes were as a flame of fire, and on his head were many crowns; and he had a name written, that no man knew, but he himself.

Genesis 32:29 (KJV)
And Jacob asked him, and said, Tell me, I pray thee, thy name. And he said, Wherefore is it that thou dost ask after my name? And he blessed him there.

Judges 13:17-18 17 (KJV)
17And Manoah said unto the angel of the LORD, What is thy name, that when thy sayings come to pass we may do thee honor?
18And the angel of the LORD said unto him, Why askest thou thus after my name, seeing it is secret?

What is the difference between a Rasch model and a mixed-effects logistic regression?

I’ve recently been learning about the Rasch model. Previously I’ve used various kinds of generalized regression, including linear as well as logistic and “vanilla” fixed-effects models as well as models with random effects.

What I still haven’t been able to understand from my reading is what distinguishes the Rasch model from an ordinary mixed-effects logistic regression which includes random effects for person and item, and includes no fixed effects. The mathematical formulation for the two appears to be essentially the same, except the parameters in the exponent in the logistic function are shuffled and relabeled. Almost all the stuff I’ve read about the Rasch model spends a lot of time talking about its conceptual underpinnings and its applications in test design, and very little time talking about its technical details and how they are the same as or different from other statistical techniques.

So, what is the difference? If I have a table of results like this:

Person    Item   Result
A         1      Right
A         2      Wrong
...
B         1      Wrong
B         2      Right
...etc.

What is the actual difference between feeding this data to a Rasch model, versus feeding it to a mixed-effects logistic regression and interpreting the random effect weights as “person ability” and “item difficulty”?

Question: What’s the difference between COSMETIC and ESTHETIC as adjectives?

e.g.,

“… we would agree that a larger [eyeglass] frame would probably work better from a COSMETIC standpoint although what you have is pretty close to a proper classic fit (functionally, the frame appears to be big enough for progressive lenses so that size or any larger would work fine.)”

vs.

“… we would agree that a larger [eyeglass] frame would probably work better from an ESTHETIC standpoint although what you have is pretty close to a proper classic fit (functionally, the frame appears to be big enough for progressive lenses so that size or any larger would work fine.)”

What is the default behaviour for device orientation when switching between apps?

I think there is probably a technical dependency involved, but I will ask the question from a user experience perspective.

Many mobile devices run apps that have a default orientation (i.e. landscape or portrait), and depending on the way the person is holding the device the app might also be displayed in the ‘up’ or ‘down’ position in landscape view (this is not as much of an issue in portrait view as there is usually an orientation that is accepted to be correct.

I have noticed that when multiple apps are running on a mobile device, sometimes you can experience situations where you are holding the device in one orientation in landscape view, and then when you close that app or switch to another one you have to rotate the device so that it is in the right orientation.

So there are a number of factors at play in determining the orientation of the display:

  • General settings on the hardware device (e.g. allow auto-rotate)
  • General settings on the software application (e.g. allow auto-rotate)
  • The starting position in which the person is holding the device

I assume that from a user’s perspective the display should always be with respect to how the person is holding the device, but given hardware and software configurations this may not always be the case.

Hence, is there some standard or guideline in managing the orientation of the device, especially when the user is switching between different apps to allow an optimal user experience?