I invited my friend but I realised that I forgot/had forgotten to give him the address

I invited my friend, but later l realised that l ……. to give him
the address.

  • A: forgot
  • B: had forgotten

I think that B is true but it’s written in the book that A is the correct one.
Is that because the first action is the verb “give” not the verb “forget”? but I think that the verb to give didn’t actually happen.
Can someone please explain why A is the correct answer?

Help understanding “to have” in sentences like “I would have liked to have invited few people.”

Yes, I am still confused with the sentences like ‘ to have’ but not all the sentences related ‘to have’. I can understand the sentences below:

I am happy to have been invited by him.

He was happy to have met Mr. Smith.

He was supposed to have married on 20 December.

You have to have made a reservation.

He must have been driven to despair to have killed her.

But I do not understand the sentences like:

It is considered normal for the people these days to have had some practical knowledge before joining some a new job.

It is better to have loved & lost than never to have lost at all.

I would have liked to have invited few people.

It would have been nice to have had great Bollywood presence. The most popular symbol of India.

If a group such as Women in STEM hosts an interview event, am I, as a man, allowed/invited to go? [on hold]

At my college, a group that represents women in STEM is hosting a mixer and interview session with a tech company. All students of related majors received an email with details on how to sign up to go, and no requirements (such as gender) were mentioned. However it is hosted and advertised by Women in STEM, and while not explicitly stated, is it implied that this event is aimed at women? If I went, would I be seen as pushy or insensitive?

Edit: Whether this is off-topic or not I don’t know. But I do know that this isn’t something that is answered on a case-by-case basis as @apaul claims. There are many examples of this.

How to understand “Minnie invited Mickey next door.”

Minnie invited Mickey next door.

I saw this sentence from a children’s book. It’s a simple one. But I’m confused by the meaning. In my opinion, it can be understood as:

  1. Minnie invited Mickey, who lives next door, to her house.

  2. Minnie invited Mickey to her home, which is the next door.

So, what would be the correct way to understand the sentence?

If a group such as Women in STEM hosts an interview event, am I, as a man, allowed/invited to go? [on hold]

At my college, a group that represents women in STEM is hosting a mixer and interview session with a tech company. All students of related majors received an email with details on how to sign up to go, and no requirements (such as gender) were mentioned. However it is hosted and advertised by Women in STEM, and while not explicitly stated, is it implied that this event is aimed at women? If I went, would I be seen as pushy or insensitive?

If a group such as Women in STEM hosts an interview event, am I, as a man, allowed/invited to go?

At my college, a group that represents women in STEM is hosting a mixer and interview session with a tech company. All students of related majors received an email with details on how to sign up to go, and no requirements (such as gender) were mentioned. However it is hosted and advertised by Women in STEM, and while not explicitly stated, is it implied that this event is aimed at women? If I went, would I be seen as pushy or insensitive?