Could the UK “take Ireland hostage?”

Consider the following sequence of events:

  1. In March, the UK fails to reach an agreement with the EU and exits with no deal.
  2. The UK leaves the British side of the Irish border open, to comply with the Good Friday Agreement (and to comply with the UK’s repeated and strenuous assurances that there would be no hard border). No customs personnel are placed there, there are no immigration checks, etc.
  3. Ireland begins the process of placing customs and immigration along the Irish side of the border, to comply with EU customs laws.
  4. The UK accuses Ireland of violating Good Friday, and demands that Ireland keep the border open.
  5. Ireland is thus forced to either violate Good Friday or leave the EU customs union.

Does anything specifically prevent the UK from doing this? If not, why is Theresa May not using the threat of this outcome as leverage against the EU? Based on the failure of the Chequers deal, it’s obvious she is in dire need of some kind of leverage. Of course, such a threat need not be explicit; she could just as easily say something like this in a public statement:

Although [the latest round of negotiation] was discouraging, the people of Ireland and Northern Ireland need not worry. The UK is fully committed to an open border, even in the unlikely event we do not agree on a deal with the EUC.
We trust that Ireland shares our commitment.

(Later, when journalists start asking questions about the boldfaced sentence, state that it is not UK policy to comment on future actions of other countries and that the journalists must consult Ireland.)

Presumably, the UK would eventually want to negotiate a trade deal with someone other than the EU, and an open border with the EU would make that difficult or impossible, but that’s not nearly as immediate a problem as (5). The question is whether the UK has already made some agreement that prevents this state of affairs, not whether the UK might have a hypothetical future reason to do so.

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Work & Travel in Ireland

I just had the idea for some work&travel in Ireland after finishing High School next year where I’ll be 19 years old. I don’t know much about work&travel, a little bit more about Ireland (as my plan is to move there one day). I found websites online for work&travel but I actually don’t quite get what I’d be booking there. Accomodation and jobs have to be found by myself so what am I paying for?

I’m from Austria if that is of importance.

Questions:

  • Are there any online communities, websites, facebook groups etc. with tips for organizing a work & travel in general or for Ireland?

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Could the UK “take Ireland hostage?”

Consider the following sequence of events:

  1. In March, the UK fails to reach an agreement with the EU and exits with no deal.
  2. The UK leaves the British side of the Irish border open, to comply with the Good Friday Agreement (and to comply with the UK’s repeated and strenuous assurances that there would be no hard border). No customs personnel are placed there, there are no immigration checks, etc.
  3. Ireland begins the process of placing customs and immigration along the Irish side of the border, to comply with EU customs laws.
  4. The UK accuses Ireland of violating Good Friday, and demands that Ireland keep the border open.
  5. Ireland is thus forced to either violate Good Friday or leave the EU customs union.

Does anything specifically prevent the UK from doing this? If not, why is Theresa May not using the threat of this outcome as leverage against the EU? Based on the failure of the Chequers deal, it’s obvious she is in dire need of some kind of leverage.

Presumably, the UK would eventually want to negotiate a trade deal with someone other than the EU, and an open border with the EU would make that difficult or impossible, but that’s not nearly as immediate a problem as (5). The question is whether the UK has already made some agreement that prevents this state of affairs, not whether the UK might have a hypothetical future reason to do so.

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Do I need a UK transit visa if I have Ireland’s GNIB/IRP card? [duplicate]

This question already has an answer here:

  • Is there a way to find out if I need a transit visa for a layover in the UK?

    2 answers

I have Stamp 4 on my IRP card in Ireland(formerly GNIB) and working full-time here. I am traveling from Dublin to Delhi via Heathrow Airport in London and would be changing terminals at the airport.

So, my question is, do I need to apply for a UK transit visa. My colleagues have gone via the same route and they said to me that a UK transit visa isn’t necessary if you have an IRP card but just wanted to make sure.

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Do I need a UK transit visa if I have Ireland’s GNIB/IRP card?

I have Stamp 4 on my IRP card in Ireland(formerly GNIB) and working full-time here. I am traveling from Dublin to Delhi via Heathrow Airport in London and would be changing terminals at the airport.

So, my question is, do I need to apply for a UK transit visa. My colleagues have gone via the same route and they said to me that a UK transit visa isn’t necessary if you have an IRP card but just wanted to make sure.

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Liability of Open Ended Investment Company in Ireland

As fas as I was able to find in web, there are three main company types in Ireland:

  • Limited companies
  • Unlimited companies
  • Funds

I need to know a liability of the shareholders of Open Ended Investment Company. I suppose that it should be a limited company but I can’t found anything about it at all.

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How can the Northern Ireland backstop take effect if there is “no deal”?

The Northern Ireland “backstop” is the fall-back position currently being negotiated as part of the UK/EU Withdrawal Agreement with regard to treatment of the UK/Eire border should the UK exit without an agreed deal with the EU.

Is this understanding correct?

But if there is no agreed deal with the EU, then the Withdrawal Agreement is not agreed, and so surely the backstop is also not agreed? Or is this a special case?

I think I am missing some part of my understanding here…

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Is it possible to stay in Ireland with a work visa provided by another EEA country?

Hypothetically, if one were working in Ireland and didn’t have time for the disorganized Irish government to sort out a working visa to permit full time work, would a working visa from another EEA country be a possible avenue?

In other words, if a company has subsidiaries in EEA countries other than Ireland could it allow an employee to work in Ireland, even if “remotely working” from that country?

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Smart TV not finding apps (from Ireland to UK) [migrated]

I have a Sony Bravia 4K (2017) and I have moved from Ireland to the UK. While my Play Store is correctly set to UK, I cannot see/install basic apps like the BBC iPlayer. If I check the Play Store on the web, it tells me that the apps are not compatible.

I checked tutorials and they say to try “network -> refresh Internet content”, but I couldn’t find the button under network.

Any tips?

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Smart TV not finding apps (from Ireland to UK)

I have a Sony Bravia 4K (2017) and I have moved from Ireland to the UK. While my Play Store is correctly set to UK, I cannot see/install basic apps like the BBC iPlayer. If I check the Play Store on the web, it tells me that the apps are not compatible.

I checked tutorials and they say to try “network -> refresh Internet content”, but I couldn’t find the button under network.

Any tips?

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