Ignoring the tail of the letter “Q” in the node of a TikZ diagram

In the following TikZ diagram, $triangle{ABC}$ is an acute triangle, and $triangle{PQR}$ is inscribed in it. L is the point on the line through P and Q that is closest to A.

I would like to typeset the label for Q at the intersection of the green lines along AC and LP as if I were typesetting the letter “O.” The tail of the letter “Q” is pushing it too far from the point it represents.

documentclass{amsart}
usepackage{amsmath}
usepackage{amsfonts}

usepackage{tikz}
usetikzlibrary{calc,intersections}

begin{document}

begin{tikzpicture}

%A triangle and its orthic triangle are drawn.
path (-1.75,0) coordinate (A) (2.75,0) coordinate (B) (0,3.25) coordinate (C);
draw (A) -- (B) -- (C) -- cycle;
%
path node[anchor=north, inner sep=0, font=footnotesize] at ($(A) +(0,-0.15)$){$A$};
path node[anchor=north, inner sep=0, font=footnotesize] at ($(B) +(0,-0.15)$){$B$};
path node[anchor=south, inner sep=0, font=footnotesize] at ($(C) +(0,0.15)$){$C$};
%
path ($(B)!(A)!(C)$) coordinate (P) ($(A)!(B)!(C)$) coordinate (Q) (0,0) coordinate (R);
draw (P) -- (Q) -- (R) -- cycle;
%
%
%The foot of the altitude from A onto the line through P and Q is labeled L.
coordinate (L) at ($(P)!(A)!(Q)$);
draw[dashed] (L) -- (Q);
draw let p1=($(L)-(P)$), n1={atan(y1/x1)} in node[anchor=n1, inner sep=0, font=footnotesize] at ($(L) +({n1+180}:0.15)$){$L$};

draw let p1=($(A)-(P)$), n1={atan(y1/x1)} in node[anchor={n1+180}, inner sep=0, font=footnotesize] at ($(P) +(n1:0.15)$){$P$};
path node[anchor=north, inner sep=0, font=footnotesize] at ($(R) +(0,-0.15)$){textit{R}};


draw[name path=path_1, green] ($(A)!0.15cm!90:(C)$) -- ($(C)!0.15cm!-90:(A)$);
draw[name path=path_2, green] ($(P)!0.15cm!-90:(L)$) -- ($(L)!0.15cm!90:(P)$);
coordinate[name intersections={of=path_1 and path_2, by=label_Q}];
path node[anchor=south east, inner sep=0, font=footnotesize] at (label_Q){$Q$};

end{tikzpicture}

end{document}

Guess the letter in one question puzzle. It’s a Relic [on hold]

I am thinking of one of the following five letters

R

E

L

I

C

You can ask me one question to guess which letter it is.

Rules

No question related to the number of the letter in the alphabet order, like

” If the letters A to Z go from 1 to 26, what is the number of the letter you are thinking?” Or anything that relates to that order

No compound questions that may contain “and” “or”. No multiple questions disguised as single questions.

No obvious questions like “what letter are you thinking or what words begin with your letter etc”

I am reasonably knowledgeable but am allowed to ask for clarification of your question or check it to be sure

Guess the letter in one question puzzle. It’s a Relic

I am thinking of one of the following five letters

R

E

L

I

C

You can ask me one question to guess which letter it is.

Rules

No question related to the number of the letter in the alphabet order, like

” If the letters A to Z go from 1 to 26, what is the number of the letter you are thinking?” Or anything that relates to that order

No compound questions that may contain “and” “or”. No multiple questions disguised as single questions.

I am reasonably knowledgeable but am allowed to ask for clarification of your question or check it to be sure

Question: How can I data validate an Excel cell to require at least one letter and one number?

I have a field in Excel where we enter a name and a phone extension to print out on an assignment sheet. The users often enter the name, but do not assign them a phone to carry for their shift. As a reminder, I want to validate the field and issue an error if it does not contain at least one letter and one number.

Any help on how to do this? Thanks! Typically, the entry would look like this:
PCA: John 79826

or

PCA: Sue S. 79844

it should be somewhat freeform, but needs to contain at least one number.

In the letter to Cramer, what is the implication or significance of being a North Dakotan or being Prairie…

Recently there was a letter to Cramer which includes Domestic violence and ends with bravery or a badge of honour “We are all North Dakotans. We are all Prairie tough.”

It is available here too, but based on comments, some users in some areas may not have access to any of this material.

Here is a snippet:


That is prairie tough.
We are all survivors of domestic violence, sexual assault, or rape.
We are all North Dakotans.
We are all prairie tough.

In this letter, what is the implication or significance of the victims being a North Dakotan or being Prairie tough ?
In any case, the same implication or significance is valid for the culprits too.

End of Question

Some thoughts on this:
Now, if Spartans are attacked by Corinthians (for example), Spartans may invoke their honour by saying “We are Spartans; We are tough; We will not retreat”.
Or if an Ape Army attacked Humans (another example), we might say “We are Humans, we are masters of Earth”.
The two sides of the fight are not overlapping. The implication or significance is “We are better than our aggressors”.

But in this case, the victims as well as culprits are North Dakotans, both of whom are Prairie tough.

What do all those cryptic number and letter codes in a lens name mean?

When looking at a lens name, there are a lot acronyms describing its features (often specific to the manufacturer).

Examples, Nikon:
Nikon AF-S DX 16-85mm VR f/3.5-5.6G IF-ED
Nikon AF-I 600mm f/4D IF-ED
Nikon AF-S VR Micro-NIKKOR 105mm f/2.8G IF-ED

Examples, Canon:
Canon EF 85mm f1.2L USM Mark II
Canon 70-300mm f/4.5-f/5.6 DO IS

Examples, Sigma:
Sigma 150mm F2.8 EX APO DG HSM Macro
Sigma 70-200mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSM
Sigma 50-150mm F2.8 EX DC APO HSM II

How do I decipher these lens codes from different manufacturers?

In the letter to Cramer, how is being a North Dakotan a badge of honour? [on hold]

Recently there was a letter to Cramer which includes Domestic violence and ends with bravery or a badge of honour “We are all North Dakotans. We are all Prairie tough.”

It is available here too, but based on comments, some users in some areas may not have access to any of this material.

Here is a snippet:


That is prairie tough.
We are all survivors of domestic violence, sexual assault, or rape.
We are all North Dakotans.
We are all prairie tough.

Now, if Spartans are attacked by Corinthians (for example), Spartans may invoke their honour by saying “We are Spartans; We are tough; We will not retreat”.
Or if an Ape Army attacked Humans (another example), we might say “We are Humans, we are masters of Earth”.
The two sides of the fight are not overlapping.

But in this case, the victims as well as culprits are North Dakotans, both of whom are Prairie tough.

In the letter to Cramer, how is being a North Dakotan a badge of honour ?