Any examples of diagnoses, therapies or rehabilitation procedures based on patients writing code?

For various neurological or psychiatric conditions, treatments and rehabilitation procedures have been developed that try to stimulate affected functionalities, e.g. music therapy or chess play for dementia.

I am wondering whether there are any such examples where active coding by the patients is used as a diagnostic, therapeutic or rehabilitation measure.

This question is not about patients who have written software that was then used in their diagnostics, therapy or rehabilitation (I know that this happens too). Instead, it is about the act of coding as a measure to help reveal or treat or otherwise improve a patient’s condition.

Any examples of diagnoses, therapies or rehabilitation procedures based on patients writing code?

For various neurological or psychiatric conditions, treatments and rehabilitation procedures have been developed that try to stimulate affected functionalities, e.g. music therapy or chess play for dementia.

I am wondering whether there are any such examples where active coding by the patients is used as a diagnostic, therapeutic or rehabilitation measure.

This question is not about patients who have written software that was then used in their diagnostics, therapy or rehabilitation (I know that this happens too). Instead, it is about the act of coding as a measure to help reveal or treat or otherwise improve a patient’s condition.

Do higher levels of medical intervention lead to better outcomes for patients?

There is a lot of variation in levels of medical treatment and spend across the USA. That variation has been studied by, for example, The Dartmouth Atlas Project. They conclude that more isn’t better:

In regions where there are relatively fewer medical resources, patients get less care; however, there is no evidence that these patients are worse off than their counterparts in high-resourced, high-spending regions. Patients do not experience improved survival or better quality of life if they live in regions with more care. In fact, the care they receive appears to be worse.

Is is true that more medical interventions and higher spend don’t improve the outcomes for patients?

Do higher levels of medical intervention lead to better outcomes for patients?

There is a lot of variation in levels of medical treatment and spend across the USA. That variation has been studied by, for example, The Dartmouth Atlas Project. They conclude that more isn’t better:

In regions where there are relatively fewer medical resources, patients get less care; however, there is no evidence that these patients are worse off than their counterparts in high-resourced, high-spending regions. Patients do not experience improved survival or better quality of life if they live in regions with more care. In fact, the care they receive appears to be worse.

Is is true that more medical interventions and higher spend don’t improve the outcomes for patients?