What is the percent flattening in Haumea?

I’ve recently noticed that in Wikipedia articles such as Pluto (Link), there’s this number that says how much flattened it is (Definition Here). In Pluto, it’s >1%.

Haumea, which is a very flattened dwarf planet, actually doesn’t have this information on Wikipedia, and I haven’t been able to find it online.

It would be great if someone could find this info (and it’s source as well), because I can’t seem to find it anywhere.

Thanks in advance!

Bcache writeback_percent max value

I’m tryng to set

writeback_percent

at a value > 40 but it only accept value between 0 and 40.

If i set

echo 50 >   /sys/block/bcache0/bcache/writeback_percent 

then when i read the value

more  /sys/block/bcache0/bcache/writeback_percent

i have 40.
For value<=40 the settings work fine.

My setting for cache type are

more  /sys/block/bcache0/bcache/cache_mode 
writethrough [writeback] writearound none

I know this is dangerous but this is not a problem for me.

As far as i understand writeback_percent is the % used from dirty data in cache, why i can’t use 90% or 100% of available space?
May be i dont’ understand quite well this settings?

Average of some percent numbers [on hold]

For a scientific purpose, I want to analyze the function calls of a software program. Assume, some functions are called with different arguments and for each one, I have some statistics which are shown by percent. Example:

     function                stat1 (%)          stat2 (%)
funcX(int a)      =>           45                  55 
funcX(char c)     =>           10                  90
funcX(float f)    =>           10                  90
funcY()           =>           10                  90

As you can see the vertical summation is not 100% but the horizontal summation is 100% and that is fine.

Now, I want to know what is the average percent of funcX for each stat? Which method is preferred? Arithmetic or harmonic or geometric?

For stat1:

arith mean = 21.6
  har mean = 13.5
  geo mean = 16.5

I know that for rates, arithmetic average is not very meaningful. But, should I use harmonic mean which is normally used for rates? The answers here was not helpful!

Average of some percent numbers

For a scientific purpose, I want to analyze the function calls of a software program. Assume, some functions are called with different arguments and for each one, I have some statistics which are shown by percent. Example:

     function                stat1 (%)          stat2 (%)
funcX(int a)      =>           45                  55 
funcX(char c)     =>           10                  90
funcX(float f)    =>           10                  90
funcY()           =>           10                  90

As you can see the vertical summation is not 100% but the horizontal summation is 100% and that is fine.

Now, I want to know what is the average percent of funcX for each stat? Which method is preferred? Arithmetic or harmonic or geometric?

For stat1:

arith mean = 21.6
  har mean = 13.5
  geo mean = 16.5

I know that for rates, arithmetic average is not very meaningful. But, should I use harmonic mean which is normally used for rates? The answers here was not helpful!

Question: Trump supporters: Why do you agree with 100 percent of what Trump says and does?

I can understand why some people voted for Trump, but it seems like most Trump supporters think this man is right all the time and that he’s never wrong.

Like it’s funny because you accuse democrats of being so far-left, but you’re so far-right yourself.

lololol!

I just think far-left AND far-right voters are all stupid.

Thank for independents.

Learn to think for yourself or continue to be enslaved by democrats/republicans.

What is the percent flattening in Haumea?

I’ve recently noticed that in Wikipedia articles such as Pluto (Link), there’s this number that says how much flattened it is (Definition Here). In Pluto, it’s >1%.

Haumea, which is a very flattened dwarf planet, actually doesn’t have this information on Wikipedia, and I haven’t been able to find it online.

It would be great if someone could find this info (and it’s source as well), because I can’t seem to find it anywhere.

Thanks in advance!

We got a very high percent mass of SO4 in BaSO4 after gravimetric analysis

so my class did a gravimetric analysis lab.

Objective: To determine the identity of an unknown sulfate via gravimetric analysis.

Procedure:

  1. Zero out the balance then weigh a Li2SO4 sample. Record the mass, then transfer the sample into a 250 mL beaker

  2. Add 50 mL distilled H2O and 20 drops of 6 M HCl to the beaker. Stir the beaker until the sample is dissolved. Leave the stirring rod in the beaker once finished.

  3. On a hot plate, heat the solution in the beaker to approximately 90 C. Using a LabQuest to track the temperature, remove the solution from the hot plate once it reached 90C.

  4. Add about 30 mL (30 g) of 0.1 M BaCL2 to a 50 mL beaker. Barium is in excess so who cares about the exact volume?

  5. SLOWLY drop the BaCL2 to the beaker while stirring (about 2-3 minutes). Rinse your stirring rod off into the solution when finished, and allow the BaSO4 precipitate to settle for about 5 minutes.

  6. Record the mass of a weigh boat.

  7. While the precipitate is settling, set up a flitration apparatus using the Buchner funnel and sidearm flask. Mass the filter paper before placing it into the funnel and wetting it down.

  8. After the precipitate has settled in the solution, pour it into the funnel to filter out the solid. RINSE THE BEAKER AND STIRRING ROD WITH DISTILLED WATER to get all the precipitate onto the filter paper. Refilter if the filtrate is cloudy, but not more than 3 times.

  9. Using a spatula, remove the filter paper from the funnel and place it on a weigh boat. If any precipitate remains in the funnel, rinse it into the weigh boat. Take the weigh boat and put it into the drying oven.

  10. The filtrate in your flask is safe to pour down the drain. Clean up your station.

  11. The next day (in our case, the next week and then some because of fall break), record the mass of the filter paper, BaSO4, and weighboat COMBINED.

Some mistakes we made (as far as we can remember):

  1. On Step 5, we dropped the BaCl2 slowly at first, but it was too slow, so we picked up the pace and dropped it FAST a few minutes later.

  2. Mid-filtration, we used tap water instead of deionized water in order to get more precipitate through the filter.

  3. There may have been some hair that may have gotten into the solution, although they have negligable effect.

Data:

*Mass of Sample (Li2SO4): 0.27g

Mass of Filter Paper: 0.38g

Mass of Weighboat: 2.23g

Mass of BaSO4, Filter Paper, Weighboat: 3.43g*

Calculations:

molar mass of BaSO4 = 3.43 – 2.23 – 0.38 = 0.82 g BaSO4

moles of BaSO4 = 0.82 g / 233.31 g = 0.0035 mol BaSO4 (3.51 * 10^-3 mol)

% SO4 = 96.07g SO4 * 100 / 233.31 g BaSO4 = 41.18%

mass SO4 in 0.0035 mol = 0.82 * 41.18 / 100 = 0.34 g SO4

0.34 g SO4 * 100 / 0.27 g Li2SO4 = 125.93%

So despite all our mistakes implying that the mass of SO4 would have decreased, the experimental percent mass actually got up to 125.93%! In comparsion, the theoretical mass percent, from Li2SO4, was 87.37%!

So a percent error of 44.13%.

Meanwhile, another lab group got the same percent error, but their mass actually decreased. This led some of us to believe that the samples were swapped at some point in the lab on accident, but the leader of the other group denies this.

So you would think that I have good reasons to explain my data in my conclusion? Wrong. The teacher doesn’t want to see errors attributed to the equipment, and would like to see some errors related to the chemistry behind it that could have happened regardless of how loyally we were to the procedure. Sure she will also accept the sample swap theory, but only if there is concrete proof.

Because of that, my group is absolutely stomped as to how to explain the dramatic mass increase in such a way that would be accepted by the teacher.

Please help us out by tomorrow 9am PST, which is when it is going to be due. Thanks!

Question: How could it be that my DNA test came back as ’18 percent Chinese’ when my entire family are not…

Literally, no one in our known family history is from China. 18 percent is a BIG number. So if my ancestors have Chinese heritage, that’s going to have to be a HUGE number of people for my test to come back that high…