Are poem recital and poetry recitation correct and interchangeable?

I searched on the Internet about poem recitation, and what came up was poetry recitation or poem recital.

Which is more grammatically correct?

All topic

About English poetry

During my studying English, I thought about how we learn our native language.

Mine is Russian. At school we learn a lot of poetry, different poems we learn by heart.

So my question is, how often English children in school learn verses? Could it be helpful in my learning?

All topic

How can I typeset and annotate bilingual poetry?

I need to translate into English and annotate Latin poetry (specifically Horace’s satires, which I will copy and paste from here), and then annotate the Latin.

Ideally I would have to make minimal to no changes to the Latin I copy and paste in for typesetting purposes (i.e. appending // after every line). If it is possible, I would like to write the actual text of the annotations in the source code outside of the text of the Latin, but this is non-essential. I need to be able to annotate a word, phrase, and preferably (although this is not an absolute requirement) a series of non-consecutive letters, words or phrases. The annotations, which are in English, range from about a sentence in length to a small paragraph.

If it is possible I would like to set the poetry out in columns – i.e. Latin on one side, and English on the other, with lines that more or less line up, but I am not fussed about where the annotations go, although it would be better if they were on the same page as the text they annotate and if there were some sort of visual link between the annotation and the text annotated (like a line). I would guess that there are 1-3 annotations on a given line, although that number occasionally is higher.

I’ve looked at various solutions for two columns of text, but I’m stuck on annotations that don’t require a horrendous amount of markup within the text annotated, and even then I’m not sure about how to do annotations well.

Thanks in advance.

All topic

How can I typset and annotate bilingual poetry?

I need to translate into English and annotate Latin poetry (specifically Horace’s satires, which I will copy and paste from here), and then annotate the Latin.

Ideally I would have to make minimal to no changes to the Latin I copy and paste in for typesetting purposes (i.e. appending // after every line). If it is possible, I would like to write the actual text of the annotations in the source code outside of the text of the Latin, but this is non-essential. I need to be able to annotate a word, phrase, and preferably (although this is not an absolute requirement) a series of non-consecutive letters, words or phrases. The annotations, which are in English, range from about a sentence in length to a small paragraph.

If it is possible I would like to set the poetry out in columns – i.e. Latin on one side, and English on the other, with lines that more or less line up, but I am not fussed about where the annotations go, although it would be better if they were on the same page as the text they annotate and if there were some sort of visual link between the annotation and the text annotated (like a line). I would guess that there are 1-3 annotations on a given line, although that number occasionally is higher.

I’ve looked at various solutions for two columns of text, but I’m stuck on annotations that don’t require a horrendous amount of markup within the text annotate, and even then I’m not sure about how to do annotations well.

Thanks in advance.

All topic

Names for forms of ancient poetry

I am preparing an edition of Sappho in Chinese, and need to mention the various meters she used, because it is according to meter that the fragments are arranged. Do ancient forms of poetry like “Sapphic stanzas”, “Alcaic stanzas”, “Glyconians”, “Asclepiads” and such have established Chinese names?

All topic

Question: How do you like my rhyming poetry?

Question: How do you like my rhyming poetry?

Question: How do you like my rhyming poetry?

Nancy Ninefinger challenged Michael
But he never had a chance
Michael pulled Nancy’s puppet strings
Dance, puppet, dance!

All topic

Question: Does Poetry.com have another site for our poems ?

Question: Does Poetry.com have another site for our poems ?

Question: Does Poetry.com have another site for our poems ?

All topic

Question: Is this poetry?

Question: Is this poetry?

Question: Is this poetry?

“The Devil Went Down To Georgia”

The Devil went down to Georgia. He was lookin’ for a soul to steal.
He was in a bind ’cause he was way behind. He was willing to make a deal
When he came across this young man sawin’ on a fiddle and playin’ it hot.
And the Devil jumped upon a hickory stump and said “Boy, let me tell you what.”

“I guess you didn’t know it, but I’m a fiddle player, too.
And if you’d care to take a dare I’ll make a bet with you.
Now you play a pretty good fiddle, boy, but give the Devil his due.
I’ll bet a fiddle of gold against your soul ’cause I think I’m better than you.”

The boy said, “My name’s Johnny, and it might be a sin,
But I’ll take your bet; and you’re gonna regret ’cause I’m the best there’s ever been.”

Johnny, rosin up your bow and play your fiddle hard.
‘Cause Hell’s broke loose in Georgia and the Devil deals the cards.
And if you win you get this shiny fiddle made of gold,
But if you lose the devil gets your soul.

The Devil opened up his case and he said, “I’ll start this show.”
And fire flew from his fingertips as he rosined up his bow.
And he pulled the bow across the strings and it made an evil hiss.
And a band of demons joined in and it sounded something like this.

When the Devil finished, Johnny said, “Well, you’re pretty good ol’ son,
But sit down in that chair right there and let me show you how it’s done.”

“Fire on the Mountain.” Run, boys, run!
The Devil’s in the house of the rising sun;
Chicken’s in the bread pan picking out g out dough.
Granny, does your dog bite? No, child, no.

The Devil bowed his head because he knew that he’d been beat.
And he laid that golden fiddle on the ground at Johnny’s feet.
Johnny said, “Devil, just come on back. If you ever wanna try again,
I done told you once—you son of a *****—I’m the best that’s ever been.”
And he played:

“Fire on the Mountain.” Run, boys, run!
The Devil’s in the house of the rising sun;
The chicken’s in the bread pan picking out dough.
Granny, will your dog bite

All topic

Someone who has a wonderful talent in poetry

Which one of the following sentences sounds more natural to you to describe someone who has a wonderful poetic talent:

  • He has a great / wonderful poetic talent.
  • He has a great / wonderful poetic gift.
  • He is very talented in poetry.

I had a research on the internet, but the only thing that I found was that these three bold parts can be used in these ways (here), but I was not sure about the sentences’ structures that they can be used.

All topic