From high school to college to professional sports, why do the same teams seem to consistently win and lose…

I’m not a big sports fan, but I know Auburn, the SEC, the Yankees are winners, but then the Mets, the Cubs, the Browns tend to lose.

I would think over years that there would a more cyclical win/lose cycle, but it seems pretty consistent, even over decades.

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Books similar to “Teaching Developmentally”, but for high school math

I’ve been extremely excited by my reading of the book Elementary and Middle School Mathematics: Teaching Developmentally by Johan A. Van de Walle et al.

Does anyone know of similar books (or other references) for high school mathematics (grade 9-12), by which I mean either of the following:

  • books that explain in detail how to set up a problem-based classroom in grade 9-12,
  • books that provide a perspective of the mathematical content taught at grade 9-12 together with how teenagers best learn that content.

PS: This question is a more specific version of A good book for Juniors/senior/high school similar to VanDeWalle middle school? which has not been answered.

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Which 80’s old school house song is this?

This song is from an old cassette tape which has been recorded from the radio in the late 80’s/early 90’s.

The genre from my understanding is called old school house.

It features samples saying: “So why does it got to be so damn tough?” and “Yes, do you have any drums in your house?”

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B3xgBwn1dURCWUZIWDZ3XzdSYk0/view?usp=drivesdk

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Optimization explained to a middle school kid

Let’s say you play the game of collecting the maximum amount of coins along a path in the $(x,y)$ plane. The total amount of coins collected $S$ is given by $S = 5x + 7y$ where $5$ and $7$ represents the number of coins collected by walking respectively one unit in the $x$ and $y$ direction. However I can only go as far as one unit of distance ($x²+y²=1$).

It turns out that the solution to the problem is so such that $y/x = 7/5$ or said in other words, the ratio of how much you have to walk in the $y$ direction compared to in the $x$ direction is the same as the ratio of the rates at which you collect the coins in the $y$ direction compared to in the $x$ direction.

My question : suppose I have to explain this result to a middle school student who does not know any calculus of trigonometry. He is also quite shaky on describing equations of lines in the plane so I would not rely on that. How can I convince him with intuition that the two ratios are the same? (I’m not looking for a series of algebraic equations but rather for some kind of a visual proof).

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Question: Activities to do in high school that you can join without trying out?

Question: Activities to do in high school that you can join without trying out?

Question: Activities to do in high school that you can join without trying out?

My freshman year of high school just started, and I’m pretty bored. I can’t do sports because I was traveling during try-outs. I tried out for the play and the dance team, but I didn’t make either. Do you have any ideas for something else I could do outside of school?

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Question: Should I transfer back to my old school where are my friends are but poor education or stay as a loner at my new school withbettereducation?

Question: Should I transfer back to my old school where are my friends are but poor education or stay as a loner at my new school withbettereducation?

Question: Should I transfer back to my old school where are my friends are but poor education or stay as a loner at my new school withbettereducation?

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Question: What to do when there’s no hot girls at this year of school ?

Question: What to do when there’s no hot girls at this year of school ?



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