Which notebook is better to use Android Studio?

I need a notebook to use Android Studio. Which one below is better (all models have 8GB RAM and 15.6″ FHD screen)?

And what is most important in my case (RAM, Processor, SSD…)?

You can also recommend me another model, but notice that:

  • I want a notebook, not a desktop
  • I want to keep this notebook for at least 5 years (but I can upgrade specific things like SSD or RAM)
  • I can not afford a notebook that costs above R$ 4,000 (~ US$ 1,180 – import taxes included)

.

Samsung Expert X51 (R$ 3,040)

  • Intel Core i7 7500 U
  • 1TB HD

LG Gram 15Z970-E.BH71P1 (R$ 3,500)

  • Intel Core i5 7200U
  • 128GB SSD

Asus Vivobook X510UR-BQ292T (R$ 3,500)

  • Intel Core i7 8550U
  • 1TB HD
  • NVIDIA GeForce 930MX 2GB

Samsung Gaming Odyssey (R$ 3,900)

  • Intel Core i7 7700HQ
  • 1TB HD
  • GeForce GTX 1050 4GB

A real-analytic radial function on closed unit ball which peaks at zero is strictly decreasing

Let $mathbb{B}$ be the closed unit ball in $mathbb{C}^n$ and let $g:mathbb{B}rightarrow mathbb{C}$ be a real-analytic radial function such that $g(0)=1$ and $|g(z)|<1, forall, text{non-zero}, zin mathbb{B}$. It is claimed that there is a small neighbourhood $B$ of $0$ such that $|g(z)|<|g(w)|$ if $z,win B$ and $z,wneq 0$.

Now from the definition of radial function, we have that $g(z)=g(w)$ whenever $|z|=|w|$. Combining it with real-analyticity I get that $g$ has a power series expansion near zero in the even power of $|z|$, i.e., in $|z|^{2alpha}$ where $alpha$ is a multi-index. But I could not show the monotonicity.

Please help.

That vs Which (Solved using Gerund)

Apologies for re-opening a discussion on this topic, nevertheless, I’d like to hear your opinion on this. Take this sentence:

There are ethical reasons that may lead John to opt for this choice.

My impression is that if in a sentence you can safely replace “that” with a gerund, then it’s correct to use “that” (instead of which):

There might be ethical reasons leading John to opt for this choice.

I just wonder if this approach could be an easier shortcut for choosing between that/which.

Thanks!

Which sentence is correct? sold out/selling out/having sold out/having sold

  1. There were more than 10,000 tickets for Adele’s concert in LA, all of them selling out within 32 seconds.
  2. There were more than 10,000 tickets for Adele’s concert in LA, all of them sold out within 32 seconds.
  3. There were more than 10,000 tickets for Adele’s concert in LA, all of them having sold out within 32 seconds.

I asked the similar question before but I did not get the clear answer so I asked it in different way. Hope someone can help me understand it better. If you are a English speaker, which sentence above looks correct to you?

The steps when I think about this sentence.

  1. There were more than 10,000 tickets for Adele’s concert in LA, all of them ____ within 32 seconds. (using non-finite verb)
  2. The transformative forms of the non-infinite verbs:

main verb(V)and non-infinite verb(V’)

|-------|----------------------------------|---------------------|--------------------|
|       |-V'happens before V---------------|V,V' at the same time| V' happens after V
|-------|----------------------------------|---------------------|--------------------|
|active |having done(adverbial only)       |doing                |to do
|-------|----------------------------------|---------------------|--------------------|
|passive|having been done(adv. only)/did   |being done           |to be done        |
  1. sell out is the construction for active voice to substitute passive voice, using the first row
  2. Based on the meaning, cannot use “to sell out”…
  3. I am not quite sure then…

I feel 1, 2 and 3 are all correct. Also I feel “There were more than 10,000 tickets for Adele’s concert in LA, all of them having sold within 32 seconds.” and “There were more than 10,000 tickets for Adele’s concert in LA, all tickets having been sold out within 32 seconds.” are also correct….I am confused..

Kaggle project suggestion which has more scope for EDA, data cleaning and feature selection [on hold]

I am new to data science. I have learnt Linear Regression, Logistic Regression, Decision Tree(Gradient Boosting,Random Forest etc), Neural Networks, KNN and KMeans & Hierarchical Clustering and have good understanding of Statistics, Data cleaning and data preprocessing. I would to like to take up some project on kaggle which is not so complex and not so easy and which will help in understandning EDA more.

What does this phrase (“..for who knows which ideas now considered …might one day upset the prevailing…

The following sentence is a GRE style text-completion sentence, where you must fill in each blank from only one of three enlisted options.

It is telling that some scientific ideas that were once (i) _______ have recently garnered (ii) _______ the intelligentsia, for who knows which ideas now considered (iii) _______ might one day upset the prevailing paradigms.

(i) forgotten
ridiculed
protected

(ii) disapprobation from
currency amongst
scorn from

(iii) overtly elaborate
patently false
beyond reproach

The answers given are ridiculed, currency amongst and patently false respectively.

I am struggling to understand the part of the sentence after the comma

for who knows which ideas now considered (iii) _______ might one day upset the prevailing paradigms.

What does this mean? That there are ideas that sometime in the future will upset the prevailing, accepted view? How does this clue help to decide what answer goes in option (iii)? Without this, I’m also unable to answer the first two blanks.

Is there a word that denotes the process by which a new leader is selected?

I’m looking for a word that describes the process by which a leader is chosen. I would use “election”, but that word contains too much information about the details of the process. I need something that doesn’t refer to any particular way of going about the selection process – a general term that encompasses election, appointment, coup d’etat, etc.

Ideally, I’d like something that has both noun and verb forms. A technical, niche, or uncommon word would be okay, but an excessively long word would not be very useful.